Your Guide to Nuisance Neighbors and a Homeowner’s Rights

Your Guide to Nuisance Neighbors and a Homeowner’s Rights

Scott Dylan Westerlund
Scott Dylan Westerlund
 | 

The Constitution grants every United States citizen the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It does not, however, give your neighbors the right to bother you with excessive noise! The pursuit of happiness does not include violating a homeowner’s rights by being a nuisance neighbor.

Are you wondering whether or not your noisy neighbors are violating your rights? Are you interested in learning how to file a noise complaint, and whether or not your neighbors will find out that you’re the one who made the call? If so, then this article is for you. Learn everything you need to know below.

What Are a Homeowner’s Rights When it Comes to Excessive Noise From Neighbors?

In America, we are (mostly) free to do what we’d like to in private so long as it’s not infringing on anyone else’s rights. When it comes to noise violations, though, homeowners and renters alike both need to take certain steps to ensure they’re not being a nuisance neighbor and creating unbearably loud situations for their communities.

Almost every community has laws regarding excessive, unreasonable, or unnecessary noise levels. When it comes to summer parties, there are several situations that are defied as infringing upon your neighbor’s rights. For example, excessive noise is unreasonable when it’s occurring past 11 PM and before 7 AM. Most Americans use that time period to sleep, so it’s not reasonable to be excessively loud at night. It’s also not reasonable or necessary to have your party music so loud that it’s bothering other houses in your neighborhood.

What to Do When Your Neighbor Continues to Commit Noise Violations

Do you think your neighbor’s summer parties are infringing on your rights? Do you believe that their noise level is excessive, unnecessary, or unreasonable? If so, then your first step should be to research the law in your community. If you live in a neighborhood with a Homeowner’s Association, then you’ll also want to check out the rules that apply to your neighborhood, too.

Once you get informed, you’ll be in a better position to make a choice on what to do next. If you learn that your neighbor isn’t quite breaking the law, then it may be best to approach them and talk with them about the situation. Most neighbors do not want to be a nuisance, so they’ll at least try to be quieter.

Noisy Neighbors? How to File a Noise Complaint

What if you’ve already attempted to approach your neighbor about your concerns, though? What if you’ve asked them multiple times to keep the noise level down? If negotiating and compromising aren’t working, then it’s time for you to formally warn your neighbor. Depending on how comfortable you feel, you may decide to get a copy of your local noise laws and e-mail them to your neighbor. If you don’t feel comfortable doing that, then you can always phone the non-emergency police line and ask an officer to kindly warn your neighbor about your local noise laws.

Are you and your neighbor still not seeing eye to eye? If there’s an immediate noise problem, then you may need to phone the police again. Let them know that this isn’t the first time you’ve tried to resolve the issue with your neighbor. If you’ve already done that before in the past, too, then it may be time to petition your local court for a solution. Small claims court is designed to help you resolve minor issues like the one you’re experiencing if you want to seek out monetary damages. If you aren’t worried about monetary damages but just want your neighbor to stop being noisy, then you’ll want to sue in regular court. They should be able to provide a court order demanding that your neighbor respect your local noise laws.

Are You Dealing With a Nuisance Neighbor?

Are you currently dealing with a neighbor who is both noisy and a nuisance? If so, then it’s normal to want to get informed about your rights and options. In the best situations, you can talk it out with your neighbor and reach a compromise. In the worst situations, you may have to uphold your rights by asking the police or your local courtroom to get involved. Remember, you should only take this route if your neighbor is repeatedly violating your rights.


Do you have more questions about how to deal with your nuisance neighbor or excessive noise violations in your neighborhood? Are you considering going to court? If so, then it’s advised that you consult with a quality attorney before you take the next step. Use our lawyer search area now to locate a quality local attorney who can help you move forward and start enjoying a peaceful and quiet home.

This article is intended to convey generally useful information only and does not constitute legal advice. Any opinions expressed are solely those of the author, not LawChamps.
Scott Dylan Westerlund

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